Community Rides

Azilda and Chelmsford Tour

This ride tours the communities of Azilda and Chelmsford, in the former town of Rayside-Balfour. The majority of its population is francophone and is reflected in the names of the streets and roads.

Azilda gets its name from Azilda Bélanger (née Brisebois), the first female pioneer of the area and wife of Joseph Bélanger, mayor of Rayside from 1899–1900 and again in 1905. Founded in 1868, Chelmsford started out as an outpost on the Canadian Pacific Railway. As with many communities in Northern Ontario, logging and fur trapping were the first industries, followed by farming and mining. Both are now mostly residential communities, with a number of farms in the area growing corn, potatoes, and small fruit. Don Poulin Potatoes (Notre Dame Street, Azilda), distributes to most grocery stores in Greater Sudbury. Azilda and Chelmsford are home to the popular Rayside-Balfour Days festival.

All roads are residential or rural, with the highest speed of 60 km/hour. All complex intersections are signaled.

To make the ride a bit longer, at the end, you can divert onto the gravel road Fire Route S or Brabant/Laurier to go for a swim at Whitewater Lake Park.

Start location: The Edgar Leclair Arena in Azilda where you can park your car for free in the Arena parking lot.

Legend
red = on road (quiet and busy), some of which may be bike routes and edge lines
blue = cycling infrastructure (bike lanes or cycle tracks)
brown = trail/path (crusher dust or paved)

Downtown to Copper Cliff

The ride starts in downtown Sudbury and goes to Copper Cliff and back. It runs along parts of the Junction Creek Trail to the former Inco Company town of Copper Cliff, and the quaint Little Italy neighbourhood. Stop at the base of the Superstack for some pics!

Copper Cliff was incorporated as a separate company town in 1901 and many of the houses are older and built for the employees of Inco Limited. The Superstack is the tallest chimney in the Western Hemisphere and the second tallest in the world. Little Italy is reached via a steep hill and is at the base of the Superstack. Reminiscent of Italy, it has tiny winding streets with houses fronting directly on the street. The Societá italiana di Copper Cliff (Italian Club) is one of the oldest social clubs in the area.

You can extend your stay by visiting the Copper Cliff Museum, 26 Balsam Street, which is located on the site of the very first homestead.

A mix of trails, roads, residential streets, paved paths, cycle tracks, bike lanes. No high traffic or high speed 4-lane roads. All busy road crossings are signaled (traffic lights), including Regent Street which has a push-button mid-block traffic bike light.

Start location: Elgin street municipal parking lot. Parking fee may apply during business hours.

Legend
red = on road (quiet and busy), some of which may be bike routes and edge lines
blue = cycling infrastructure (bike lanes or cycle tracks)
brown = trail/path (crusher dust or paved)

Flour Mill /Nickeldale/Donovan/Elm West Tour

Tour of the Flour Mill /Nickeldale/Donovan/Elm West neighbourhoods. While New Sudbury (including the Nickledale area) is fairly new with most development starting in the 1950/60's, the other neighbourhoods are some of the oldest areas of Greater Sudbury that reflect the Francophone settlements of the late1800s in the Flour Mill and the Western European immigrants and their families who settled in the West End and Donovan. Early immigration started in 1883 when Finnish, Italian and Polish immigrants came to work at the construction of the rail line. More immigrants came to work in the mines in the 1950s. The other major ethnic groups that settled in these areas include Ukrainians and Germans. This is reflected in the local area halls/clubs that include the Ukrainian Centre, the Polish Combatants Hall, the Croatian Centre, the Società Caruso Club, and the now defunct Serbian Club.

Some things to see or stop at: the Flour Mill silos (build in 1911), the Flour Mill Museum in O'Connor Park on Dell street, and the quirky Kathleen Street with several vegan restaurants.

This is an urban ride, with a mix of trails, residential streets including bike routes with edge lines, and a section of Lasalle Boulevard which is a heavy traffic 4-lane 50 km/hr road.

Start location: Cambrian Arena where you can park your car for free

Legend
red = on road (quiet and busy), some of which may be bike routes and edge lines
blue = cycling infrastructure (bike lanes or cycle tracks)
brown = trail/path (crusher dust or paved)

Garson to Falconbridge

This ride goes from the community in Garson to the historic neighbourhood of Falconbridge and back. Falconbridge is a former "company town" that was named in the 1880s for William Glenholm Falconbridge, a justice of the High Court of Ontario. The original settlement in the township was a small lumber camp. A significant ore body was discovered in 1902 by Thomas Edison near what is now Falconbridge's Centennial Park. The Edison Ore-Milling Company was unsuccessful in establishing a mining operation, and abandoned his original claim in 1903. The claim reverted to Crown land until the Longyear Drilling Company bought it in 1911. Longyear subsequently merged with other small mining companies in the area to form the basis of what would ultimately become Falconbridge Ltd., although actual mining operations in the community did not begin until 1928, when Thayer Lindsley purchased the company for $2,500,000 and finally sunk the Falconbridge deposit's first mine shaft the following year. (from Wikipedia).

A mix of a higher-traffic 2-lane 80-km/hr road with paved shoulders and quiet residential streets in the towns.

Start location: Garson Community Centre/Arena

Legend
red = on road (quiet and busy), some of which may be bike routes and edge lines
blue = cycling infrastructure (bike lanes or cycle tracks)
brown = trail/path (crusher dust or paved)

Hanmer to Capreol

This ride starts in the east end of Hanmer and through the picturesque downtown Capreol and then back to Hanmer. Capreol is situated on the Vermillion River and is the City of Greater Sudbury's northernmost populated area. Founded in 1911, it began as a railway town around the Capreol railway station, which was a major divisional point on the Canadian National Railway line.

There are many older homes in the town.

Extend the ride by stopping for tea at the Capreol Railroad Museum or tour the Capreol Heritage Centre located in the former fire hall, police department and municipal offices. (admission costs).

Residential streets (50 km/hr) and 2-lane rural roads (60 to 80 km/hr), with a block on MR 80 (Old Highway 69) which is a heavy traffic 4-lane 60 km/hr road.

Start location: Centennial Arena in Hanmer, where you can park your car for free.

Legend
red = on road (quiet and busy), some of which may be bike routes and edge lines
blue = cycling infrastructure (bike lanes or cycle tracks)
brown = trail/path (crusher dust or paved)

Lively/Mikkola Tour

A tour of the Lively/Mikkola neighbourhoods in the former town of Walden. This ride has some beautiful quiet back roads, rolling hills, and some wonderful scenery.

The Mikkola neighbourhood has a large Finnish population, who began immigrating to the Sudbury region in the late 1880s, as evidenced by the names of many streets in this area. Lively has a good selection of restaurants and shops for stopping as you cross MR 55 from Black Lake Road. For an extended tour continue past the turn at Niemi Road to tour around the residential neighbourhoods of Lively or visit the Anderson Farm Museum on Main St. just past the where the route turns onto Niemi Road.

Mostly quiet back roads, but a caution when crossing the Trans-Canada Highway at Kantola Road, which is a 90 km/hr road, with 2 straight traffic lanes and multiple turn lanes.

Parts of this ride are on the Lake Huron North Shore Cycling Route which goes from Greater Sudbury to Sault Ste. Marie, and is part of the Great Lakes Waterfront Trail provincial cycling routes.

Start location: Fielding Memorial Park - look for the resident swans! There's also a 4.5 walking/mountain bike trail that starts at the park that will take you to Fielding Bird Sanctuary and has awe-inspiring views of Kelly Lake. A shorter section of trail will take you directly to the Sanctuary.

Legend
red = on road (quiet and busy), some of which may be bike routes and edge lines
blue = cycling infrastructure (bike lanes or cycle tracks)
brown = trail/path (crusher dust or paved)

Long Lake/South End Tour

This ride is a loop around the south end of Greater Sudbury.

A ride of lakes! Ride through the new Moonglo subdivision with its beautiful homes, on the Robinson Lake Trail with a view of Robinson Lake, leading to a residential area and then rural roads with views of Kelly Lake and Long Lake. Lots of beautiful Northern Ontario scenery.

The community of Long Lake began as a lumber town in the early 1900's and a gold mine was established in 1909. Dairy farms were quite common in the area and it was known as a farming community until about 1940. It was originally settled by people of French or Ukrainian descent, and later Finnish settlers.

Sections of heavy traffic 4-lane roads at 60-80 km/hour without paved shoulders or edge lines. The majority of the ride is on residential streets and rural roads.

Start location: South End Walmart Superstore parking lot

Legend
red = on road (quiet and busy), some of which may be bike routes and edge lines
blue = cycling infrastructure (bike lanes or cycle tracks)
brown = trail/path (crusher dust or paved)

MacFarlane Lake Tour

This loop in the south end of Greater Sudbury goes from the "Four Corners" of Regent/Paris Streets and tours around Lake MacFarlane with an optional stop at Kivi Park. An entrance fee or membership is required to bike or hike at Kivi Park. The lovely valley around McFarlane Lake has winding roads with rolling hills and views of a few old farms, and of the lake.

A mix of a few sections of high-traffic roads, with quiet rural roads with great Northern Ontario natural scenery. Highway 69 (TransCanada Highway) has paved shoulders all the way back to the Four Corners intersection.

Start location: Food Basics Mall

Legend
red = on road (quiet and busy), some of which may be bike routes and edge lines
blue = cycling infrastructure (bike lanes or cycle tracks)
brown = trail/path (crusher dust or paved)

Minnow Lake to Coniston

Ride from Minnow Lake to Coniston and back. Tour around this small but lovely community. Originally a small farming community, it became a railway town along the Canadian Pacific Railway main line built in 1883. A lumber mill was built to to help meet the demands for lumber in the railway industry. In 1913, Mond Nickel Company moved its smelting operations from Victoria Mine to Coniston, and it built streets, sidewalks, and drainage for access to water for fire protection. Many of the the homes and other buildings, including the Presbyterian and Anglican churches, were moved from Victoria Mine when those workers moved to Coniston to follow the jobs.

1913, the Mond Nickel Company smelter officially began operating in Coniston and a roast yard was soon added approximately 1.6 km from the Coniston smelter. It was in these roast yards that the mined ore would be piled and set afire for two or three months to burn off the sulphur in the ore. Thus started the immense ecological damage to the area that was eventually reversed by the world-famous Regreening Program of Greater Sudbury. From 1978 to 2019, over 3,400 hectares of land were limed and grassed and over 9.8 million trees have been planted.

The ride stops at the Minnow Lake Legion and to see a wonderful view of Ramsey Lake.

A mix of rural roads, residential streets, and bike lanes. No high traffic or high speed 4-lane roads.

Start location: Carmichael Arena, Bancroft Drive

To make a longer ride, you can turn right at Moonlight Drive, go down to the beach for a swim, and then come back to Bancroft and continue on to Coniston. Or swim as you come back!

Legend
red = on road (quiet and busy), some of which may be bike routes and edge lines
blue = cycling infrastructure (bike lanes or cycle tracks)
brown = trail/path (crusher dust or paved)

New Sudbury to Garson

The ride starts in New Sudbury and goes to Garson and back, to tour this community north-east of the downtown core. The area around Garson was originally a trapping route used by the Hudson's Bay Company for fur trading and was established in 1867. It became a lumber town in the 1880s to 1910. The logs were brought to the railway (located where the Greater Sudbury Airport now stands) by horse-drawn sleds and loaded onto railway cars. They were then transported along the Wahnapitae - North Western line to the Township of Wahnapitae. From there, they were dumped onto the frozen Wanapitei River to await the spring thaw and their final journey to the sawmills at Byng Inlet.

Ore was discovered in the Garson area in 1891. In 1907, Garson Mine was starting to process ore and the Mond Nickel Company began construction of homes in the area for their permanent employees in the area called "Company Town" (Armstrong, Henry,
McDougall, Pine, and Young Streets). Other town areas developed into "FinnTown" and The "Business Section". Mond Nickel Company merged with INCO in 1929.

A mix of high traffic and higher speed roads and residential streets, with some paved shoulders on rural road sections. This ride includes riding on high traffic roads with speeds of up to 80 km/hr. Includes traveling on Lasalle Boulevard, which is a 4-lane urban 50 km/hr road, Falconbridge Road which is a 4-lane rural 60-80 km/hr road, and a section of Maley Drive which is a 3-lane (with center turning lane) rural road section with a speed of 60 km/hr. Also a 2-lane roundabout at the Maley/Lansing intersection. All busy road crossings are signaled (traffic lights), and we have designed the ride so there are only right-hand turns at these intersections. Most of the heavy-traffic rural road sections have good paved shoulders.

Start location: Sudbury Place (SuperMall)

Legend
red = on road (quiet and busy), some of which may be bike routes and edge lines
blue = cycling infrastructure (bike lanes or cycle tracks)
brown = trail/path (crusher dust or paved)

New Sudbury Tour

Tour of the New Sudbury area with a great ride on the Rotary Trail, which is a link between New Sudbury and the Downtown, and on the New Sudbury Historical Trail which runs parallel to Lasalle Boulevard.

The "centre" of New Sudbury is considered to be the New Sudbury Centre, built and opened in the 1950s, which is the largest shopping mall in Northeastern Ontario. With the building of the New Sudbury Centre, more people built homes in the area with the majority of them built after 1960. Once sprawling farm land, including cattle and dairy farms, it is now a large residential community with large business corridors located on Lasalle Boulevard, Barrydowne Road, and Falconbridge Road. Two of the original farm homes are still standing and has been reincarnated as a businesses on Lasalle Boulevard. It is home to Cambrian College, Adanac Ski Hill, Timberwolf Golf Course, and Northern Ontario Film Studios. Junction Creek runs through the area and along it the Junction Creek Trail with a section called the Rotary Trail, which serves as a beautiful and peaceful way for many residents to walk or bike through the area to the mall or towards downtown. Built in 2018, the New Sudbury Historical trail parallels Lasalle Boulevard and allows people to walk or bike from Barrydowne Road to almost the Lasalle Boulevard/Notre Dame Avenue intersection in a natural corridor with views of the Nickeldale Dam and the city's only moraine, the Nickeldale Moraine (moraine: soil and rock left behind by glaciers).

This is an urban ride, with a mix of trails, residential streets including bike routes with edge lines, and a few short sections of Lasalle Boulevard, a busy arterial road.

Start location: Spacecraft Brewery, Notre Dame Avenue

Legend
red = on road (quiet and busy), some of which may be bike routes and edge lines
blue = cycling infrastructure (bike lanes or cycle tracks)
brown = trail/path (crusher dust or paved)

Ramsey Lake Cycle Tour de Sudbury

The iconic Ramsey Lake Cycle Tour de Sudbury takes cyclists around Ramsey Lake via dedicated bike lanes, trails and some on-road sections. There are no heavy traffic, high speed 4-lane roads on this ride, but there are a few challenging hills.

In 2004, this route was first used in an organized event by the city's Bicycle Advisory Panel to promote cycling in Greater Sudbury, and a number of organized event have been held throughout the years on this route. Bring your swimsuit for a swim at Moonlight Beach or at Bell Park!

The start of the ride is along Ramsey Lake Road with a choice of paved shoulders or the Ramsey Lake Path which is a multi-use paved path, with initial views of the Idylwilde Golf Course on the right, and entrances on the right to the Sudbury Yacht Club and the Northern Water Sports Centre. Closer to Laurentian University, you'll see views of Ramsey Lake on the left and the Living With Lakes Center, a multidisciplinary research and monitoring institute designed to assist in the protection and management of northern aquatic ecosystems. The building is one of the most environmentally well designed buildings in North America and ranked as one of Canada’s greenest buildings. It has been recognized with the Bronze Award for North America in the global Holcim Awards for Sustainable Construction in 2008 and two prestigious awards from the Ontario Association of Architects for design excellence and sustainability. The ride continues through Laurentian University, a mid-sized bilingual university that also houses the Northern Ontario School of Medicine. The next section is through the Lake Laurentian Conservation Area on the Moonlight Beach Trail which starts at the BioSki Cross Country Ski & Snowshoe Club parking lot, where you'll find some bike tools and pump if you need a quick fix to your bike. The Conservation area offers 2,415 acres (950 hectares) of protected green space that you can explore later with hiking or single-track mountain bike trails. You can stop for a quick swim at Moonlight Beach, which offers rest areas, a volley ball court and a beautiful shallow beach perfect for families. Then return to the starting point on some roads with bike lanes back to downtown, over the Nelson Street Pedestrian Bridge to quiet residential streets through to Bell Park. Bell Park is Greater Sudbury's premier municipal park, named for William J. Bell, an early lumber baron. It contains the Grace Hartman amphitheatre, home of many concerts and festivals; the Jim Gordon Boardwalk that connects the park to Science North; swimming beaches; and many other amenities. Finish off a perfect ride with a swim at Bell Park, or at the Science North outdoor dining patio which is open during the summer months. Or spend some time at Science North, Northern Ontario's most popular tourist attraction.

Start location: Science North, Ramsey Lake Road. Parking fees may apply. An alternative parking area is at the York Street Parking lot at Paris/York streets.

Legend
red = on road (quiet and busy), some of which may be bike routes and edge lines
blue = cycling infrastructure (bike lanes or cycle tracks)
brown = trail/path (crusher dust or paved)

Short Loop around Nepahwin Lake

The ride starts and stops at Science North and the route circles Lake Nepahwin, a popular lake for swimming and other recreational activities in the heart of downtown Greater Sudbury. The ride is a mixture of urban and residential roads, and multi-use paved paths and trails. Caution when riding on Paris Street, which is a busy 4-lane 60km/hr road.

Lake Nepahwin is the third largest lake in the heart of Greater Sudbury, with Ramsey Lake at 7.92 square kilometers, Lake Laurentian at 1.28 square kilometers and Lake Napahwin at 1.27 square kilometers. Nepahwin is an Indigenous name meaning "sleeping lake". It was adopted on August 4, 1949 following a community plebiscite.

Start location: Science North parking lot. Parking fees may apply during business hours. An alternative is to park right around the corner at the York Street parking lot.

Legend
red = on road (quiet and busy), some of which may be bike routes and edge lines
blue = cycling infrastructure (bike lanes or cycle tracks)
brown = trail/path (crusher dust or paved)

Short Loop around the Donovan and Flour Mil

This ride starts and ends at Cambrian Arena and will take you around two historic neighborhoods of Greater Sudbury.

Travel along the Cambrian Heights area, through College Boreal grounds, along the Selkirk Trail which also goes through the Terry Fox Sports Complex, then through Northern Heights, and down Frood Road to the Donovan. The ride continues to the Flour Mill, with a section along a portion of the Junction Creek Trail. The ride finishes on the Notre Dame Bikeway cycle track, which provides a safe ride separated from motorized vehicle traffic on this busy arterial road.

Donovan/Cambrian Heights: Centered on Frood Road northwest of downtown, Donovan refers to the area immediately surrounding the intersection of Frood, Kathleen, and Beatty - the lands between the two sets of railroad tracks. Northern Heights is the newer neighbourhood built in the 1970s to the north. The area's narrow lots and laneways give it a distinctive appearance. Donovan Street (1928) was named for Timothy Donovan, farmer, who purchased the land from the crown. After WWII, the area was settled by many Eastern European immigrants, mainly from Ukraine, Poland, Finland and the former republic of Yugoslavia. Each of these ethnic groups founded community halls in the Donovan. It is currently seeing a revitalization, with several vegan eateries on Kathleen Street.

Flour Mill: The Flour Mill neighbourhood is centred on Notre-Dame Avenue and Kathleen Street, immediately north of downtown Sudbury, from Jogues Street to Wilma Street, including the area north to Pioneer Manor. It is the French Quarter of the city. One of the city's first neighbourhoods outside the original settlement, the Flour Mill was historically settled by Franco-Ontarian farmers and labourers. The neighbourhood's most notable surviving building, a large flour mill silo, was operated by the Manitoba and Ontario Flour Mill company starting in 1910. The silo was designated a city heritage property in 1990. Other notable buildings include the Catholic parish church of Église St-Jean-de-Brébeuf and the École catholique Sacré-Coeur. From the early 1900s into the 1960s, the neighbourhood was frequently flooded by spring runoff into Junction Creek. The residential Cambrian Heights neighbourhood extends northward from the Flour Mill along Cambrian Heights Drive. Collège Boréal and its campus is in this area. In the south-east part of the neighbourhood lies Primeauville, which consists of Leslie, Mont Adam, Harvey, Myles and Mountain and St-Joseph streets. This area was named for a local priest.

Start location: Cambrian Arena. Parking is free.

Legend
red = on road (quiet and busy), some of which may be bike routes and edge lines
blue = cycling infrastructure (bike lanes or cycle tracks)
brown = trail/path (crusher dust or paved)

Short Loop around the South End

Tour of the New Sudbury area with a great ride on the Rotary Trail, which is a link between New Sudbury and the Downtown, and on the New Sudbury Historical Trail which runs parallel to Lasalle Boulevard.

The "centre" of New Sudbury is considered to be the New Sudbury Centre, built and opened in the 1950s, which is the largest shopping mall in Northeastern Ontario. With the building of the New Sudbury Centre, more people built homes in the area with the majority of them built after 1960. Once sprawling farm land, including cattle and dairy farms, it is now a large residential community with large business corridors located on Lasalle Boulevard, Barrydowne Road, and Falconbridge Road. Two of the original farm homes are still standing and has been reincarnated as a businesses on Lasalle Boulevard. It is home to Cambrian College, Adanac Ski Hill, Timberwolf Golf Course, and Northern Ontario Film Studios. Junction Creek runs through the area and along it the Junction Creek Trail with a section called the Rotary Trail, which serves as a beautiful and peaceful way for many residents to walk or bike through the area to the mall or towards downtown. Built in 2018, the New Sudbury Historical trail parallels Lasalle Boulevard and allows people to walk or bike from Barrydowne Road to almost the Lasalle Boulevard/Notre Dame Avenue intersection in a natural corridor with views of the Nickeldale Dam and the city's only moraine, the Nickeldale Moraine (moraine: soil and rock left behind by glaciers).

This is an urban ride, with a mix of trails, residential streets including bike routes with edge lines, and a few short sections of Lasalle Boulevard, a busy arterial road.

Start location: Spacecraft Brewery, Notre Dame Avenue

Legend
red = on road (quiet and busy), some of which may be bike routes and edge lines
blue = cycling infrastructure (bike lanes or cycle tracks)
brown = trail/path (crusher dust or paved)

South End Tour

The ride goes around the South End neighbourhood of Greater Sudbury, through the grounds of Laurentian University and through Bell Park in downtown Sudbury.

The ride starts in the Entertainment District in downtown Sudbury and goes through the quiet Riverside residential area to the Junction Creek Trail. The next section along Kelly Lake Road has some truck traffic, but has bike lanes. Next is the South End area that contains the Robinson, Lockerby, Moonglo and Lo-Ellen neighbourhoods with beautiful homes and quiet streets. The ride goes close to the "Four Corners", a major commercial shopping district, and you could do a short jaunt to that area to do some shopping. The Loach's Road area is a quiet neighbourhood that leads to a path to Laurentian University, a mid-sized bilingual university that also houses the Northern Ontario School of Medicine. Once off the University grounds, the ride goes along the Ramsey Lake Path (a multi-use paved path) to Bell Park. The park is the largest municipal park in Greater Sudbury, located on the western shore of Ramsey Lake with a view of the Sudbury Yacht Club and the Northern Water Sports Centre. It is named for William J. Bell, an early lumber baron and contains the Grace Hartman amphitheatre, home of many concerts and festivals; the Jim Gordon Boardwalk that connects the park to Science North (Northern Ontario's most popular tourist attraction); swimming beaches; and many other amenities. This is almost the end of the ride, so stop to take a swim, or take a break at the Science North outdoor dining patio which is open during the summer months. An alternative is to go to one of the many pubs/eateries along Elgin Street at the end of the ride, and on certain days during the summer season, the Sudbury Farmer's Market.

A chance to see lots of different infrastructure: mix of trails, roads, residential streets, paved paths, cycle tracks, bike lanes. No high traffic or high speed 4-lane roads with the exception of a short stretch of Ramsey Lake Road. This section will be enhanced for safe cycling in 2021. All busy road crossings are signaled (traffic lights), including Regent Street which has a push-button mid-block traffic bike light.

Start location: Elgin street municipal parking lot. Parking fees may apply during business hours.

Legend
red = on road (quiet and busy), some of which may be bike routes and edge lines
blue = cycling infrastructure (bike lanes or cycle tracks)
brown = trail/path (crusher dust or paved)

Tour de Valley

This ride starts in the middle of Hanmer and tours the neighbourhoods of Val Caron, Hanmer and Val Therese. Tour rural farmland and see pastures with horses, and some impressive homes. There is a stop at Kalmo Beach on beautiful Whitson Lake, so bring your swimsuit for a great swim!

Before the amalgamation of Greater Sudbury in 2001, Valley East was Northern Ontario's sixth-largest city, originally incorporated as a separate town in the Regional Municipality of Sudbury in 1973. Economic activity began in the Valley after the Chicago fire in the United States (1871) which left 90,000 people homeless. Portelance Lumber mill is still in operation. Pionneers settled in the area to farm and raise milk cows starting in 1887, in the towns of Blezard Valley, Hanmer, Val Caron, and Val Thérèse, mainly by French Canadians from Quebec or the Ottawa Valley. Now mainly a residential community, there are still operating farms in the area farming mainly potatoes but also strawberries. Don Poulin Potatoes (Montee Principale), distributes to most grocery stores in Greater Sudbury.

Valley East is home to Valley East Days, the largest free family festival in Northern Ontario, which celebrated its 44th year in 2019.

Mostly residential streets (50 km/hr) and rural roads (60 km/hr), with a section on MR 80 which is a heavy traffic 60 km/hr municipal road on the section that is taken.

Start location: Hanmer Mall

Legend
red = on road (quiet and busy), some of which may be bike routes and edge lines
blue = cycling infrastructure (bike lanes or cycle tracks)
brown = trail/path (crusher dust or paved)